MENU

Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano
There is no there (still)  2015
single-channel High Definition digital video; 16:9, black and white, sound
10 minutes 27 seconds; edition of 3, 2 APs
Geelong Gallery
Purchased with funds generously provided by Geelong Contemporary, 2018
Reproduced courtesy of the artists and Anna Schwartz Gallery

Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano 
When mountains move (still)  2018
three-channel High Definition digital video; 16:9, black and white, colour, sound 
length variable
Commissioned by the Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Japan
Reproduced courtesy of the artists and Anna Schwartz Gallery

Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano 
When mountains move (still)  2018
three-channel High Definition digital video; 16:9, black and white, colour, sound 
length variable
Commissioned by the Aomori Contemporary Art Centre, Japan
Reproduced courtesy of the artists and Anna Schwartz Gallery


There is no there—Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano

08 December 2018 to 10 February 2019

Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano’s collaborative video works explore the relationship of the body with material objects, space and time. Their works emphasise improvisation, process, gesture and the sculptural.

There is no there, 2015, was inspired by the early Soviet Union Blue Blouse theatre collective (1924–32), an influential troupe established under the auspices of the Moscow School of Journalism, that created a type of performance called ‘Living Newspapers’ based on topical news events. Each performance, while designed to entertain, had a political message, which expressed the opinions of the Soviet regime to the working class and reinforced the power of the collective. In There is no there, the Manganos extend their concept of performance to a form of community engagement whereby fellow artists, friends and colleagues enact a series of movements and postures inspired by recent media coverage that wordlessly communicate degrees of urgency, anxiety, enquiry and stillness.

The written word, early 20th century feminism and the power of the collective also inform the Manganos’ most recent work: the three-channel video When mountains move which evolved from an artist residency at the Aomori Contemporary Art Centre in Japan in mid-2018 and is shown in Australia for the first time at Geelong Gallery.

When mountains move is inspired by a poem by Akiko Yosano published in the first edition of feminist magazine Seitō (Bluestocking) in 1911. Local Aomori women perform a series of choreographed movements that visually translate the poem across three screens representing written text, gesture as text (realised by the body), and landscape as text.

Events

Floortalk: There is no there—Gabriella Mangano and Silvana Mangano 
This event took place on Saturday 15 December

For kids: Shadow tricks—Polyglot Theatre
Wednesday 23 January, various sessions